Beautiful day at Parc de la Tête d’Or

What we choose to emphasize in this complex history will determine our lives. If we see only the worst, it destroys our capacity to do something. If we remember those times and places—and there are so many—where people have behaved magnificently, this gives us the energy to act, and at least the possibility of sending this spinning top of a world in a different direction. And if we do act, in however small a way, we don’t have to wait for some grand utopian future. The future is an infinite succession of presents, and to live now as we think human beings should live, in defiance of all that is bad around us, is itself a marvelous victory.
— Howard Zinn 
Maybe home is nothing but two arms holding you tight when you are at your worst.
— (via dewidarh)
Reblogged from noor-e-hayat
Reblogged from Throw Down Your Arms
The paths of mankind lead to death.. Why don’t you take the untrodden path that leads to life?
— Sun Ra 
Reblogged from Transcending
Only American audiences ask me, “What should I do?” I’m never asked this in third world. When you go to Turkey or Colombia or Brazil, they don’t ask you, “What should I do?” They tell you what they’re doing… These are poor, oppressed people, living under horrendous condition, and they would never dream of asking you what they should do. It’s only in high privileged cultures like ours that people ask this question… We can do anything. But people here are trained to believe that there are easy answers, and it doesn’t work that way. If you want to do something, you have to be dedicated and committed to it day after day. Educational programs, organizing, activism. That’s the way things change. You want a magic key, so you can go back to watching television tomorrow? It doesn’t exist.
— Noam Chomsky | Imperial Ambitions 
Reblogged from The Black Communist
Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir gather to distribute copies of the Maoist newspaper La Cause du Peuple on the street after it is banned by the government (Paris, 1970).

Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Simone de Beauvoir gather to distribute copies of the Maoist newspaper La Cause du Peuple on the street after it is banned by the government (Paris, 1970).

Reblogged from j.
 
Reblogged from The Wrote & The Writ
Reblogged from 意義

Tatyana Fazlalizadeh’s Street Art Confronts Sexual Harassment

Reblogged from j.
Reblogged from 3 Roads
 
Reblogged from Our Beautiful World